2005-04

Article Title Issue

A woman's work

Susan Ivey is one of a handful to reach the pinnacle in North Carolina. Among the state’s 14 Fortune 500 companies, she’s alone. Only three of the top 75 public companies based here have female CEOs.
2005-04

Boyce is one trial lawyer conservatives don't hate

Phil Haire still remembers that day 32 years ago when his roommate walked into their Alexandria, Va., apartment with an ashen look on his face. “You just won’t believe what I just heard,” Gene Boyce told him.
2005-04

Career ladder

In 1887, Charlotte hired its first four full-time firemen. The job paid $25 a month. The city now has slightly more than 1,000 firefighters on its payroll, including about 40 women.
2005-04

Cary sees signs: Sam the sham must scram

The first time Tammy Roberts drove through Cary, she thought it was fictional Stepford come to life. “Even the buildings have a boring look to them.”
2005-04

Cities try to recover from getting malled

It’s been nearly 30 years, but John Touloupas still remembers when Burlington closed part of Main Street to vehicles and built a pedestrian mall to try to resuscitate downtown, using about $650,000 in federal grants. “It upset me when they did it, because they stopped the flow of traffic,” Touloupas says.
2005-04

He followed course of a different color

Joe Miller was born outside the front door of a drugstore. He found fame and fortune inside between the aspirin and laxatives.
2005-04

Lagging attendance gives Bobcats pause

Last November, 21-year-old UNC Chapel Hill student Ben Couch and some friends went to Charlotte to be part of a history-making event — the first game of the Queen City’s new National Basketball Association franchise. Couch, a senior public-relations major, shared that moment with 23,318 other fans.
2005-04

Make work

Triad leaders profess faith in life after dearth for manufacturing
2005-04

Pro-choice

I had considered writing about the time I saved Hunter S. Thompson from getting busted when the father of gonzo journal-ism whipped out a joint in a bar frequented by off-duty Miami vice cops. But the prospect of doing two columns in a row on dead men so depresses me that, rather than ponder the mysteries of life or lack thereof, I’ll try to tackle a thornier question: What is it that women really want?
2005-04

Scratch that – handshake deal turns into a fistfight

Maybe they should have seen it coming. After all, executives of Kannapolis-based Pro-Tint Inc. and Charlotte-based United Packaging & Industrial Inc. were trying to adapt a product to help military helicopter pilots see through their windshields better. But the two companies flew blindly on a collision course created by their informal partnership.
2005-04

State auditor figured he could do better job

Les Merritt seems to have the right pedigree for state auditor. He’s the first certified public accountant to fill the post. He has been a Wake County commissioner, which gives him grassroots political experience, and he has performed public audits as a partner in Zebulon-based Merritt, Petway, Mills & Hockaday.
2005-04

Weaving tapestry is women's work

Sharon Decker is a preacher’s daughter, former beauty queen, mother, executive and now an innkeeper and business owner. When people ask her if women can have it all, she says sure. “Just not at the same time.”
2005-04