2005-07

Article Title Issue

Another view

The letter was anonymous, the writer identifying himself only as “A Southern Prep School Grad.” It was in reference to last month’s cover story on Woodberry Forest School.
2005-07

Despite ruling, this is no open-and-shut case

The state Court of Appeals says Presbyterian Hospital Huntersville, which opened in November, shouldn’t have. But it also says the hospital shouldn’t be closed. Just to mix it up more, the court says its owner should seek permission to open the hospital from the state agency that gave it permission to open in the first place.
2005-07

Doctors' doctors

His behavior had been erratic but never like this. He admired a patient’s ring and invited her to go outside to his car, ostensibly so he could show her his ring. She refused. When a man complained of an injured foot, he removed the patient’s shoe, slung it across the examination room and told him nothing was wrong with him except laziness. The man had a broken foot.
2005-07

Farmers reap bumper crop of solicitations

The story sounds familiar: Farmers find mailboxes stuffed with notices from banks and other financial institutions. But for about 70,000 tobacco growers and allotment holders, the letters aren’t duns. They’re from businesses wanting a piece of the $3.8 billion that Tar Heel farmers will start getting this month as part of the federal allotment buyout.
2005-07

Grow your own

Tony Atala is on the hot seat, though he’s fielding easy questions. He struggles to recall he’s 46, was born in South America and grew up mostly in Boca Raton, Fla. Asked when he got his bachelor’s from the University of Miami, he tilts his eyes toward a spot near where the ceiling meets a wall. “I got a bachelor’s there in, uh, uh — I forget the year, but it’s on my CV.”
2005-07

He tries to generate heat with Fuzeon

When he took the top job at Morrisville-based Trimeris Inc., some said Steve Skolsky was asking for trouble. “A lot of people outside of Trimeris advised me that taking the role of CEO and keeping the former CEO on board was something I should avoid.” Didn’t he have enough to worry about trying to sell a drug that could keep people from dying of AIDS — and his new employer from drowning in red ink — if only people would take it?
2005-07

Her group fashions ways to save soles

Maybe it’s fitting that Sally Kay hits an occasional snag as president of The Hosiery Association. Politics, for instance. Many domestic members want tariffs on imports from low-wage countries. But the international association includes members from those countries. They, of course, want no part of tariffs.
2005-07

How you gonna keep 'em down on the farm

Republican Steve Troxler won a close election for state agriculture commissioner in November that was disputed because a broken voting machine failed to record 4,400 votes. On Feb. 4, Democratic incumbent Britt Cobb conceded. Troxler has a bachelor’s in conservation from N.C. State University and owns Troxler Farms, growing tobacco and wheat in Guilford County. He recently revealed his plan for agribusiness in North Carolina.
2005-07

Low-price Wal-Mart says pay is too high

A penny saved is a penny earned. And even at a $285 billion business such as Bentonville, Ark.-based Wal-Mart Stores, pennies add up. The retail giant, whose approximately 47,000 Tar Heel workers make it the state’s largest for-profit employer, revised its pay plan in June 2004 to ensure consistency in store wages while allowing for regional differences in cost of living. “The idea was to level the playing field for all associates,” spokesman Marty Heires says.
2005-07

Paper cuts

We didn’t fire everybody,” Bob Ashley, the executive editor of The Herald-Sun, says with a nervous chuckle. “They’re out on assignment.” The newsroom of Durham’s daily newspaper is nearly empty. Fluorescent lights give a sickly green cast to the warren of paper-strewn desks. Blinds are drawn, sealing out time of day and turn of season.
2005-07

Pinehurst didn't putter around with the open

Hiring thousands of employees. Negotiating hundreds of supply contracts. Finding business partners. Millions of dollars in local economic impact that depend on your performance. Typical worries of a business executive? Sure. Then how about shutting down within a week of opening, by design? That’s what’s different about Reg Jones and Beth Kocher’s most recent venture.
2005-07

Ports chief harbors hope for expansion

Given the choice, Tom Eagar would probably prefer to be elbow-deep in an engine block of one of the Corvettes — six, so far — that he restores. “My cars have won a few show awards, but the reward really is in the process, not any payment at the end.” Good thing, then, that he keeps his day job as chief executive of the N.C. State Ports Authority.
2005-07

Trouble in river city

The September sun gives it life, siphoning moisture from the Atlantic off the coast of Africa. The earth’s rotation coaxes it into a counterclockwise spiral as it begins its two-week journey to the Gulf of Mexico, where, nudged by the jet stream, it tears northward across the Florida Panhandle into Alabama. By now it has a name — Ivan.

2005-07