2005-08

Article Title Issue

Anchor away

Maureen O’Boyle left Charlotte to find national fame. Now she’s glad to be doing the news in her hometown.
2005-08

Banks on it

Collectively, the state’s largest public companies didn’t have an awesome year, but it was better than a poke in the eye. Business North Carolina’s Top 75, which ranks public companies based in the state by their market capitalization on June 30, shows growth that was promising, if not spectacular, by several measures.
2005-08

Consistency

For the third year in a row, a story by Senior Editor Ed Martin won the gold prize for best magazine feature in the Alliance (formerly Association) of Area Business Publications Editorial Excellence Awards — the fifth time in six years a writer for this magazine has claimed top prize in that category. Pieces by Contributing Editor Irwin Speizer won it in 2000 and 2001.
2005-08

For customers, he's dyeing to tie one on

Erik Chumley will tell you with something approaching pride that he’s never done much of anything in “the rat race.” Such disdain is not surprising from someone whose résumé includes carnival work, horse-trailer assembly and just about anything else to keep the wolf from the door. Chumley, 38, is the owner and operator of The American Tie-Dye Co. in Taylorsville. Customers include Wal-Mart, and his shirts have been featured on the Survivor television show.
2005-08

For others, NASCAR Hall of Fame could be the pits

When R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. ended its 33-year sponsorship of NASCAR’s top series in 2003, Will Spencer didn’t wait. The owner of Winston-Salem-based marketing and design company JKS Motorsports asked the cigarette maker, one of his clients, for its racing memorabilia. “Most of the stuff was going to end up in a dumpster or a closet,” he says. “Such a deep-rooted piece of what NASCAR is today came from Winston and R.J. Reynolds.”
2005-08

Glazed & confused

What happened to Krispy Kreme has investors scratching their heads. Here are some hints from beyond the grave.
2005-08

He grows business from the ground up

Erik Chumley will tell you with something approaching pride that he’s never done much of anything in “the rat race.” Such disdain is not surprising from someone whose résumé includes carnival work, horse-trailer assembly and just about anything else to keep the wolf from the door. Chumley, 38, is the owner and operator of The American Tie-Dye Co. in Taylorsville. Customers include Wal-Mart, and his shirts have been featured on the Survivor television show.
2005-08

In new job, he delivers more than just a speech

Nido Qubein has been holding forth for 10 minutes, occasionally interrupted by an “mm-hmm.” He’s talking about his first few months as president of High Point University. How the trustees recruited him. How he got former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani to speak at graduation. How he raised $20 million in pledges in his first 29 days. How some students started a Web page called Nido Rocks. On and on. Finally, he’s told how long he has been expounding. “Oh, I could go for three hours. You get me started here, and I won’t quit.”
2005-08

Learn to earn

The Triangle is home of world-famous universities. But for the region to thrive, leaders say, its residents need more schooling.
2005-08

Nurseries don't dig captive competition

You’ve heard it from Triad textile and furniture manufacturers. They can’t compete with cheap foreign labor, especially in China, where some of it comes from prisoners. Now the complaint is hitting closer to home: Some Guilford County greenhouse operators say they can’t compete with the County Prison Farm in Gibsonville, where labor isn’t just cheap, it’s free.
2005-08

Sky-high land prices could derail Tweetsie

The story sounds familiar: Farmers find mailboxes stuffed with notices from banks and other financial institutions. But for about 70,000 tobacco growers and allotment holders, the letters aren’t duns. They’re from businesses wanting a piece of the $3.8 billion that Tar Heel farmers will start getting this month as part of the federal allotment buyout.
2005-08

Snack maker's new CEO gets sweet deal

David Singer made $854,026 last year in salary, bonuses and other compensation as chief financial officer of Coca-Cola Bottling Company Consolidated. He resigned in May to become CEO of Charlotte-based snack maker Lance, where he’ll make at least $1.1 million a year. But he’s still on the Charlotte-based bottler’s payroll. He’ll get $21,330 a month for the next 20 years. That’s $5.1 million.
2005-08