2005-10

Article Title Issue

Entrepreneur strikes oil in restaurants

When it comes to being an environmentalist, Brian Winslett walks the walk. Well, not exactly. “I mostly try to ride a bicycle,” says the 29-year-old general director and part owner of Asheville-based Blue Ridge Biofuels Cooperative. When he has to drive, he uses the nonpolluting biodiesel fuel that his company makes from used cooking oil.
2005-10

Executive burnishes region's golden arches

Bob Jackson stays on the move, whether in his job as senior vice president and general manager of one of McDonald’s largest operating regions or in his favorite sideline: running marathons. Jackson, 45, spends three to four nights a week traveling throughout the fast-food king’s Raleigh Region, which stretches from Kentucky to Georgia and from Tennessee east to the Atlantic Ocean.
2005-10

Far east

Leaders discuss how to orient the region's assets to promote growth.
2005-10

He doesn't like races profiling his channel

For Hunter Nickell, it all came back to cars. He was born in Detroit, the center of the U.S. automotive-manufacturing universe. Now he’s executive vice president and general manager of Speed Channel in Charlotte, a city that claims to be the center of the racing universe.
2005-10

Headquarters get ahead of themselves

If Raymond Chandler had written a book about RBC Centura Banks Inc.’s Aug. 30 announcement that it was moving its headquarters from Rocky Mount to Raleigh, he might have titled it The Long Hello. The first clue came in September 2002, about a year after Toronto-based Royal Bank of Canada bought Centura Banks. That’s when RBC Centura agreed to pay $80 million to rename the state capital’s 21,500-seat arena the RBC Center.
2005-10

No way out

Getting there, they say, is half the fun. Getting back can be no fun. Getting away, when you must but can’t, is hell. The latter two are lessons I learned during three consecutive weeks in August.
2005-10

Progress whitewashes telco's wrong number

Remember how Tom Sawyer tricked the neighborhood kids into paying him to let them whitewash his aunt’s fence? Tom got an apple, a kite, a dead rat and a string to swing it with, a key that didn’t unlock anything, a kitten with one eye and several other treasures for allowing the boys to fulfill his obligation to Aunt Polly.
2005-10

Show them no quarter

It’s a long way from Wall Street in New York City to Lee Avenue in Sanford — MapQuest says 561 miles. That doesn’t stop some of the Street’s best and brightest investment bankers from making regular calls on the headquarters of Static Control Components.
2005-10

Study links ideas and taking risks to growth


The Cassopolis, Mich.-based Edward Lowe Foundation and the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Office of Advocacy recently studied the link between innovation and entrepreneurship for 394 Census Labor Markets. Researchers found those rich in both traits were more likely to have strong economies. Raleigh ranked No. 2 and was the only North Carolina region in the top 20. (Lower rankings in the study were not made public.) But some other Tar Heel labor markets got high rankings for the number of business startups, says Washington-based Office of Advocacy economist Brian Headd.
2005-10

This move might be a shore thing

Chuck Hayes, the fiery-tempered executive who wrenched Guilford Mills Inc. into the big time, must be rolling over in the grave at Lake Lure where they laid him three years ago.
2005-10