2005-12

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In 1897, W.T. Jones built his wife a Victorian mansion, still standing on Carthage’s main street a few blocks from where it circles Moore County’s courthouse. He was the president of Tyson & Jones Buggy Manufacturing Co., which in 1890, its best year, built more than 3,000 horse-drawn carriages and shipped them all over creation.
2005-12

Black and white issue colors project

The office manager had come back from lunch, so the visitor got up and closed the door. What Sam Helms had to say was private, but Tommy Vaughan wouldn’t keep it that way. He claims Helms offered to pay his Ahoskie company not to work on a $94 million prison project near Tabor City.
2005-12

Designer will draw on past to shape future

Nancy Webster might be the most influential home-design diva you’ve never heard of. Last year, HFN, a trade publication, ranked her the third-most-powerful person in home fashion and design, behind French designer Philippe Starck and Martha Stewart.
2005-12

Grounded

Along the bottomlands, wind rustles millet planted for migrating ducks and geese. A coyote, once a symbol of the Western frontier, lopes off into the underbrush. Jack Mason, a state game biologist, isn’t surprised. “They’re everywhere nowadays. They can adapt to just about anything.”
2005-12

He keeps shows on tracks

Humpy Wheeler wanted to put on a big show, so the president of what is now Lowe’s Motor Speedway hatched a plan with his coordinator for pre-race shows to assemble a 5,000-member marching band to play.
2005-12

High Point leaders are not grieving Las Vegas

Las Vegas Mayor Oscar Goodman laid his cards on the table a year ago, sure that he held the winning hand against organizers of the High Point International Home Furnishings Market. “If I were them,” he told the Las Vegas Review-Journal, “I’d be worrying about the new furniture capital of the world: Las Vegas.”
2005-12

It was 20 years ago today

As my son, the publisher, wrote in this space last month, Business North Carolina has embarked upon its 25th year and will celebrate its silver anniversary next October. This December marks another milestone, for me at least: 20 years I’ve been working here.
2005-12

Move to fall springs new trap for golf tournament

When it comes to pro sports, Greensboro has been second-string. Sure, it hosted a National Hockey League team from 1997 to 1999 — but only because the Carolina Hurricanes were still building their home arena in Raleigh.
2005-12

Natural gas hasn't boomed in the East

Maybe it’s heresy, but the gospel of natural gas as an economic-development catalyst might have to be rewritten. A $188 million pipeline in Eastern North Carolina has failed to start a predicted stampede of industrial development.
2005-12

Opening up rivers really floats his boat

Mark Singleton is the first to admit that he’s become “an office stiff.” Shuffling papers and sitting at a desk might draw no such self-deprecation from many other 49-year-olds.
2005-12

Reign maker

While Charlotte calls itself the Queen City, the rest of North Carolina calls it other names: The Great State of Mecklenburg is the nicest. Why the hard feelings? That’s what Senior Editor Arthur O. Murray asked five leaders who live and work in Charlotte or its surrounding counties: Walter McDowell, North Carolina president of Charlotte-based Wachovia Corp.; Joan Lorden, UNC Charlotte provost; Jerry Orr, aviation director of Charlotte/Douglas International Airport; Lynne Scott Safrit, president of Atlantic American Properties Inc. in Kannapolis and the person overseeing development of California billionaire David Murdock’s proposed biotechnology project there; and Ronnie Bryant, chairman and CEO of the Charlotte Regional Partnership.
2005-12

She's boss in translation

Michelle Menard started Choice Translating Inc. 10 years ago with $200, her mother and a simple definition of success: sales of $1 million. The business brought in $10,000 its first year, and even six-figure revenue looked as daunting as Mount Everest.
2005-12

She's happiest when you just mail it in

Heather Lowry was on the move, as usual, trying to catch a plane from Charlotte to Seattle. But security guards confiscated a pocketknife from a woman in line ahead of her.
2005-12

Smart thing to do was move

By now, Kim Winslow is used to The Question: What’s a software company doing in Edenton? “In Boston, we were a small fish in a very big pond,” the president of Broad Street Software Group Inc. says. “In Edenton, we’re a medium-sized fish in a much smaller pond. There are opportunities that have come to us.”
2005-12

State’s business climate shows signs of warming

It costs more to do business here than in South Carolina, Tennessee and Georgia, but at least North Carolina is cheaper than Virginia and most other states, according to the Milken Institute.
2005-12

Stormy whether

The sand went first. As the waves of Hurricane Ophelia pounded Emerald Isle in September, thousands of tons of it, pumped onto the eroding beach in recent years, vanished back into the thrashing Atlantic. Then came more than a foot of rain. The roof caved in at Emerald Isle Video in K&V Plaza, a strip shopping center owned by Coastal Land Ventures. Then, when wind gusts hit 90 mph, the roof of Bell Cove Village, another shopping center Coastal was building on the island, began to flutter. “The wind just got up under it and lifted it off,” says Larry Watson, vice president/secretary and half owner of Coastal.
2005-12