2007-12

Article Title Issue

Burning down the house

Legislators returned to Raleigh talking tough. Democratic leaders fumed about Gov. Mike Easley's veto of incentives for Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., vowing an override. Some Republicans, suddenly finding the slippery slope of incentives to their dislike, spoke of gathering enough votes to sustain the veto. But as often happens in the state capital, bluster turned into murmur.
2007-12

Business finds fits for the pit

While growing up in Statesboro, Ga., Tom DeLoach Jr. never saw a NASCAR race. He didn’t go to his first until 1986 as vice president of marketing for oil giant Mobil. “I said, ‘Wow, this is neat!’ Boom! The light came on: ‘I like this!’”
2007-12

Christy Shaffer

Christy Shaffer can thank the board for knowing her better than she knew herself. With products on the market and a rich pipeline, Inspire Pharmaceuticals is one of the few true successes of the Triangle biotech scene. But without the board’s trickery, she never would’ve become its boss.
2007-12

Economic outlook

If you want to start a high-tech or science-heavy business in the South, there’s Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia and everyone else, says Andrew Holton, assistant director for research at The Program on Public Life at UNC Chapel Hill. Those states lead the pack, often by wide margins, in most of the conventional indicators of innovation and risk-taking. Holton led a study of entrepreneurial climates in 12 Southern states.
2007-12

Figure for

Timing is everything when you’re buying and selling stocks. And autumn 2006, it turns out, was a bad time to fall in love with financial companies — at least it was for those who participate in Business North Carolina’s annual stock-picking contest. A subsequent slump in the housing market and concerns about loan losses, among other things, punished financial stocks this summer and into the fall.
2007-12

Guts

Turner Johnson is the bravest, toughest kid I know. The son of our design/production director, he was born 12 years ago this month with a benign tumor that tethered his spinal cord to the base of his backbone. When he was 3 months old, surgeons cut it loose but couldn’t remove the growth, a glob of fatty tissue entwining itself around major nerves.
2007-12

He handles liquid assets

Pinehurst native Johnny Foster fell in love with the sea at an early age. Inspired by things he read and the exploits of marine researcher and filmmaker Jacques Cousteau, he got hooked on aquaculture, the cultivation of water plants and animals, when he was about 10. “I thought that would be a neat way to make a living, to be around salt water and on the water and scuba diving all the time.”
2007-12

Is this any way to run a railroad?

You can't live through an election season without hearing a candidate or two prattling on about how they intend to take on the "special interests" and return the government to the people. What about when the politicians and the government are the special interest?
2007-12

It's as simple as X, Y and Z

Ping Fu set out to answer an esoteric question from a colleague. She wound up creating — and then running — a company that expects to gross about $20 million this year.
2007-12

Kay Wagoner

In the 14 years since starting Icagen, Kay Wagoner, 58, has seen more ups and downs than Keith Richards’ blood-alcohol level.
2007-12

Pat Rodgers

To Pat Rodgers’ way of thinking, construction is a simple business. You do what you say you’re going to do, do it on time and stand behind your work. She has hammered those planks into a more than $350 million-a-year business.
2007-12

Pat Sullivan

Despite her father’s misgivings, Pat Sullivan figured she would be a Latin teacher. “He wanted me to be an engineer, like him.” A favorite high-school teacher intervened, pointing out the limited opportunities for making a living in a dead language and suggested biology instead.
2007-12

Take the high ground

For a quarter-century, each July University of Florida Foundation officials have packed up orange and blue banners, balloons, Gator cups and other UF paraphernalia and driven eight hours to throw a party at the favorite summer getaway spot of some of the university’s most generous donors: western North Carolina.
2007-12

Trading big blue for girl scout green

It’s not the way the cookie usually crumbles, but Rusine Mitchell-Sinclair, 55, stepped down as IBM’s top Tar Heel executive — the first woman in that post — to be CEO of Girl Scouts – North Carolina Coastal Pines, created by merging two councils covering 41 counties in the eastern half of the state.
2007-12

Upper crust

Blink and you’ll miss it. In the vast Triangle suburbia, along a parkway featuring strip malls and sprawling apartment complexes, sits La Farm Bakery. Flanked by a Papa John’s Pizza and a Caribou Coffee, La Farm oozes European charm in Cary.
2007-12