2008-03

Article Title Issue

A moderating influence

Every four years, North Carolina Republicans talk about ending the Democrats’ stranglehold on political power in the state. And every four years, Democrats usually beat them back.
2008-03

Ben Sutton

Sports is a conservative industry run by cartels that call themselves leagues. That conservatism crimps innovation. So give a double shot of credit to Ben Sutton Jr., founder of International Sports Porperties Inc. in Winston-Salem, for coming up with one.
2008-03

Biotechnology wants a lead role

After years of preparing a work force and other infrastructure, the industry is ready to take a star turn in the state's economy.
2008-03

Changing prescriptions

It’s the way Moose Drug Co. does business that has changed, radically in some ways. “When Mrs. Jones comes to us today, she’s not just getting a bottle of pills,” says Joe Moose, 43, who with his older brother owns the company. “She’s getting time with Whit and time with me. She’s getting help in order to get the most from her prescriptions. We’re selling health care.”
2008-03

Economic outlook

Despite some winter rain, North Carolina is still mighty dry. In mid-January, more than half the population was subject to mandatory water restrictions. An additional 25% was under voluntary restrictions. How has the drought affected the state economy?
2008-03

Jim Rutherford

Professional athletes don’t work all that hard. So says Jim Rutherford, and he would know. He played 13 seasons as an NHL goalie and is wrapping up his 14th year as general manager of the Carolina Hurricanes and its predecessor.
2008-03

John Swofford

Some critics called John Swofford greedy. Others labeled the commissioner of the Atlantic Coast Conference a fool.
2008-03

Judy Rose

Fans love an underdog, whether it’s a stubby hoopster like former Charlotte Hornet Muggsy Bogues or a no-way-they-can-win Super Bowl champ like the New York Giants. Count Judy Rose, 55, as someone to cheer for, too.
2008-03

Kym Hougham

Kym Hougham announced his arrival with 32 bottles of Dom Perignon. It was 2003, and he had just been hired as director of the fledgling Wachovia Championship.
2008-03

More

In a piece he recently wrote for The Washington Post, David Simon — the former cops reporter who is the creative force behind what many consider the best-written show on television — recalls what it was like as one of the “starry-eyed acolytes of a glorious new church, all of us secular and cynical and dedicated to the notion that though we would still be stained with ink, we were no longer quite wretches[.]”
2008-03

Regional Report Charlotte March 2008

Hey, Mecklenburg County: You snooze, you lose. Gaston County has taken center stage as the possible site of a detention center for illegal immigrants after the project’s main proponent, Rep. Sue Myrick, announced that “insurmountable obstacles” were dragging out the process in her home county.
2008-03

Regional Report Eastern March 2008

In late December 2005, a lawyer representing the brother of superstar Dolly Parton pitched a deal to government leaders wanting to expand the local economy: build a 1,500-seat theater that would be the linchpin of an entertainment district that could produce thousands of jobs and expand the tax base. No, this wasn’t Roanoke Rapids. That city didn’t get the offer until Currituck County had turned it down.
2008-03

Regional Report Triad March 2008

All three events occurred within a week. Asheboro-based Klaussner Furniture Industries said it was closing a plant in its hometown. Norfolk, Va.-based furniture importer Ison International announced it was moving to Thomasville. Chinese manufacturer Dream Rooms revealed it was shifting its American headquarters from Los Angeles to High Point. More evidence that, battered by foreign competition, the mighty Triad furniture industry was dwindling into warehouse and office jobs?
2008-03

Regional Report Triangle March 2008

For nearly three years, Stan Bingham has been driving around in a Volkswagen he modified to run on used vegetable oil, which the Republican state senator from Denton gets free from the General Assembly cafeteria. His bug gets more than 40 miles a gallon on it, but he has to filter the oil and start trips on diesel until the engine heats it up enough to use as fuel. A few miles before stopping, he has to remember to switch back to diesel to flush the fuel lines. Otherwise, the oil cools, gels and clogs them. “It’s really quite a chore to do this,” the lawmaker admits.
2008-03

Regional Report Western March 2008

Beauty, they say, is in the eye of the beholder. That also goes for value. Covering the landscape along a mountain road, trees are lovely to behold and create vistas that draw visitors — and their money — to western North Carolina. Thinned out, they provide prime habitat for many species of wildlife and a valuable source of timber. So the U.S. Forest Service plans to begin logging 212 acres south of Blowing Rock next year, despite the ill will the plan has reaped.
2008-03

The picture of health

Duke Executive Health Program, a division of the university’s nationally esteemed hospital, offers a level of convenience and coddling rare in today’s health-care industry.
2008-03

Wisdom of the sage's

It’s often hard to separate fact from lore, and sometimes not even worth the trouble if you subscribe to that cynical wisdom among journalists that holds, “Facts have killed many a great story.” So I use Joseph Kennedy here only as a starting point and with no certainty that his famous utterance about the shoeshine boy was true.
2008-03