2008-04

Article Title Issue

Drive to succeed

The image from last May is everlasting. After holing his final putt to win the fifth Wachovia Championship, Tiger Woods pulled his golf ball from the cup, turned and flung it into the crowd along the 18th fairway at Quail Hollow Club.

2008-04

Economic outlook

Foreclosures are on the rise in North Carolina — up 9.4% in 2007 and expected to increase as much as 20% this year. Government help for borrowers and lenders is OK, says one expert, but don’t overdo it. After all, it’s their own fault. Jacob Vigdor is associate professor of public-policy studies and economics at Duke University. He studied the subprime-mortgage market for the National Taxpayers Union, an Alexandria, Va.-based group that advocates limits on government taxing and spending.
2008-04

Going into labor

My daddy was a union man, but he didn’t cut a particularly proletarian figure in the custom-tailored suit and Sinatra-style, short-brim fedora he favored upon shedding his blue twill uniform for a night on the town. Then again, the Plumbers and Pipefitters union had been part of the American Federation of Labor — “skilled craftsmen, the aristocracy of labor,” he was quick to remind us - before its merger with the Congress of Industrial Organizations in 1955.
2008-04

Keith A. Luedeman

With a bachelor’s in math and computer science from Clemson, Keith Luedeman, 43, worked for IBM and several up-and-coming high-tech companies before starting Goodmortgage.com in 1999. With a staff of 45, it now operates in 16 states and lends more than $500 million a year.
2008-04

Luis Pastor

When Luis Pastor began volunteer work with Latino Community Credit Union in September 2000, it was meant to be a temporary gig. He and his wife had moved to Durham from Spain so she could get an MBA at Duke. He heard about the credit union, then open less than three months, and liked its mission.
2008-04

Minding market forces

Perhaps you look at the embarrassing debacle in Roanoke Rapids involving the publicly financed theater overseen by Randy Parton and think, “Well, when you lie down with third-tier country singers, you get up with a huge debt andpublic scorn.” I look at that same mess and think, “Did we learn nothing from Global TransPark and the North Carolina Information Highway?”
2008-04

North Carolina's dry heaves

Landscapers and lawn-care companies feel picked on these days. They really shouldn’t. They may soon have plenty of company when it comes to how water, or the lack thereof, affects businesses in North Carolina.
2008-04

Of arms and men

Capt. Jonathan Kuniholm crouches, low and quiet, as he and three dozen other Marines advance through a thick palm grove along the Euphrates River. The platoon is looking for Iraqi insurgents who a few hours earlier had fired at a boat patrolling near Haditha Dam. As they close in on the suspected hot spot, a homemade bomb hidden in an olive oil can explodes. Shrapnel rips through the squadron, knocking Kuniholm off his feet.
2008-04

Open to change

Jim Hyler is a vice president of the United States Golf Association, the national governing body for golf. A native of southern Virginia, he graduated in 1970 with a bachelor’s in accounting from Virginia Tech. After 10 years at Ernst & Young, he moved to Raleigh in 1980, where he joined First Citizens BancShares. He recently retired as its vice chairman and chief operating officer. Hyler recently talked about golf in the state.
2008-04

R. Scott Anderson

Talk about a rock and a hard place. When Scott Anderson took over as CEO of Bank of Granite in January, what Warren Buffett once called “the best-run bank in the United States” was facing a crisis of its own making.
2008-04

Regional Report Charlotte April 2008

Panthers. Bobcats. Checkers. Knights. Few weekends pass without Charlotte sports fans having something to buy tickets for, and that’s not counting NASCAR, golf and other events. Queen City businesses face similar choices about where to spend sponsorship money. Given all that, a football team for UNC Charlotte might be akin to having too many players on the field.
2008-04

Regional Report Eastern April 2008

Brunswick Corp. is closing its 200-employee Hatteras Yachts plant in Swansboro, a year after local boosters gave it an award for creating the jobs. But state officials say Brunswick, a Lake Forest, Ill., company with nearly $5.7 billion in revenue in 2007, will get more than $4.5 million in state and local incentives for opening another plant farther down the coast. “Regardless of what they do elsewhere, it’s going to be at our expense,” says Jim Reichardt, director of the Onslow County Economic Development Commission. “The whole thing has been a shocker to us.” Hatteras Yachts’ headquarters is in New Bern, about 30 miles away in Craven County, and Brunswick’s new plant, where hiring is under way, is in Navassa, west of Wilmington in Brunswick County.
2008-04

Regional Report Triad April 2008

Antilles Seaplanes, the Gibsonville company that wants to resurrect the famed Grumman Goose seaplane (cover story, July 2006), plans to have a production line running early next year. The company has purchased two buildings in Graham to house production of the $2.9 million aircraft.
2008-04

Regional Report Triangle April 2008

Nearly two years ago, when it dropped its bid for federal funding of a 28-mile, $810 million commuter-train line, the Triangle Transit Authority made it clear that the project had been sidetracked, not derailed. Increased global demand for concrete and steel had jacked up the cost, and changes in federal requirements made money harder to get.
2008-04

Regional Report Western April 2008

Gambling, proponents predicted, would be the biggest boon to western North Carolina since the other one — Daniel — crossed the Blue Ridge. Sin, critics cried, calling it the road to perdition when Harrah’s Cherokee Casino opened in 1998. However, the smart money now calls it the path to prosperity: A new report by Harrah’s Entertainment Inc. and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians shows the casino has grossed $1.6 billion in 10 years. The Cherokees own the casino and, except for a management fee to the Las Vegas-based operator, pocket the profit, but the economic impact reaches beyond the Qualla Boundary, as the 56,000-acre Indian reservation is officially known.
2008-04

The meat of the matter

Hermillio Sosa steps into the pulpit of First Baptist Church in Fayetteville, ready to tell his story but unable to speak many words his audience will understand. Beside him, a man repeats his Spanish sen­tences in English for the congregation, most of it black. They’re here on the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr., shot dead 40 years ago on a visit to support striking sanitation workers in Memphis.
2008-04

Tony Plath

How did an associate professor at UNC Charlotte get to be the go-to guy for commentary on North Carolina-based banks, showing up not only in the Tar Heel press but in such national publications as BusinessWeek and The Wall Street Journal?
2008-04

Wade Reece

It took BB&T’s insurance subsidiary nearly 70 years to reach $6 million in annual sales. Seventeen years after Wade Reece took the reins, it’s about to hit $1 billion. So much for oil and water not mixing — the oil being bankers, who are supposed to shun risk, and insurers, who owe their existence to it.
2008-04