2008-05

Article Title Issue

Economic outlook

If it seems your employees are getting heavier — and less healthy — it’s probably not your imagination. And you’re not alone. Though adults in North Carolina smoke less and get a little more exercise than in years past, obesity is on the rise — from 59% of Tar Heel adults in 2002 to 63% now. So says a report by NC Prevention Partners, a Chapel Hill nonprofit. Meg Molloy is executive director.
2008-05

Firming up lobbyists

For as long as anyone has kept track, the most influential lobbyists in Raleigh have been colorful characters who rose to the top of their trade on their connections and ability to schmooze prickly legislators.
2008-05

Get as good as you give

Four years ago, Ken Lewis shouldered a shovel to move dirt and shape public opinion. Bank of America Corp.’s CEO helped plant 38 dogwood trees in Boston’s Franklin Park, settling a Super Bowl bet with FleetBoston Financial’s former boss after the New England Patriots beat the Carolina Panthers, who play their home games just a few blocks from BofA headquarters in downtown Charlotte.
2008-05

J. Allen Fine

Like most businesses tied to real estate, title insurance has taken a hit from the subprime crisis. Not only has demand dropped due to fewer sales, but claims are up, Allen Fine says.
2008-05

John Cecil

Jack Cecil says Biltmore Park, about 1.1 million square feet of condos, town houses, apartments, offices and stores a rock skip from the French Broad River, is his company’s first venture in New Urbanism “unless you want to go back in family history.”
2008-05

Ken Kirkman

When it comes to coastal development, Kenneth Kirkman, 58, has seen it all.
2008-05

Leaving the nest

If you ever had cause to visit the Durham headquarters of Motricity Inc., the software company that found itself with a pile of investor cash last year, you surely marveled at the place.
2008-05

Marching on

Looking up information about Lexington’s past while fact-checking this month’s cover story, I Googled the name of my great-great-grandfather.
2008-05

Pat Riley

Pat Riley built houses while working his way through high school and college in Pennsylvania. In the last 17 years, he played a major role in building North Carolina’s largest privately owned residential real-estate company.
2008-05

Regional Report Charlotte May 2008

Jeff Bennett swears he’s not trying to drive Wallace Farm Inc. out of business. But he thinks something needs to be done about it. His neighborhood near Huntersville in northern Mecklenburg County often reeks of rotting food and manure from the company’s composting operation, and some neighbors have a hard time discussing it rationally. “There are some people who would be extremely angry and vocal and screaming at you and telling you it’s not fair.”
2008-05

Regional Report Eastern May 2008

Local opposition is knocking the wind out of efforts to promote renewable energy, but whether coastal ordinances that halt or tightly regulate electricity-generating windmills have them down for the count remains to be seen. The latest setback came in March, when Carteret County imposed a nine-month moratorium. In January, Currituck County started restricting where they can be built.
2008-05

Regional Report Triad May 2008

Even the most ardent fans of wines produced in the Yadkin Valley have to admit they’re not cheap. Critics will point out that they cost nearly twice as much as comparable wines from California, Chile, South Africa or Australia.
2008-05

Regional Report Triangle May 2008

Pick the phrase that best completes this sentence: A Yellow Pages directory is:
a) a useful way to find business phone numbers.
b) a pretty good doorstop.
c) unnecessary if you have Internet access.
2008-05

Regional Report Western May 2008

They’re finally getting somewhere with the Road to Nowhere. Sixty-five years after hundreds of Swain County families were moved to make way for Fontana dam and lake, officials are negotiating a settlement to compensate the county for the federal government’s broken promise to build a road to ancestral lands and 32 isolated family cemeteries.
2008-05

Seeking critical mass

Cities and counties in the Piedmont Triad must work together to leverage the region’s assets if it’s to compete with the Research Triangle and Charlotte as well as metro regions outside North Carolina. That is the opinion of a panel assembled by Business North Carolina for a round-table discussion sponsored by the nonprofit Piedmont Triad Regional Partnership. Participating were Don Kirkman, president and CEO of the partnership; Rosemary Wander, UNC Greensboro’s associate provost for research and public/private partnerships; Austin Pittman, president of UnitedHealthcare of the Carolinas; Chuck Greene, regional director for the Piedmont Triad Region, AT&T North Carolina; and Kevin Baker, assistant director of Piedmont Triad International Airport. The discussion, moderated by Arthur O. Murray, BNC managing editor for special projects, was held at the partnership’s office in Greensboro.
2008-05

Wendell Bullard

As a kid, Wendell Bullard had a practical, if unusual, answer to what he wanted to be when he grew up: “I wanted to be a businessman.”
2008-05

Would work

Stacks of headless bedposts and orphaned dresser drawers exude the acrid aroma of cut, cured hardwood. The screeching of planers, sanders and saws bounces off cavernous walls that echo workers calling one another from around the room. Despite the scent and sound, the place seems empty.
2008-05