2008-06

Article Title Issue

Arrested development

Flames crackle and pop as they blacken skeletons of pines unlucky enough to have taken root in this patch of Wake County. Until recently, they flourished here, thanks to ample sunlight, water and human indifference. But there’s no room for them anymore. They don’t fit the new landowner’s plans and didn’t make the grade as timber.
2008-06

Coming down the line

Outside, Charlotte is coming to life. Back home from a nearby YMCA and showered, a muscular man with a shaved head buttons his starched shirt and loops a striped tie under its collar. Four floors down the elevator and out on the street, he walks half a block, then waits in an open-sided shelter. A recorded voice breaks the stillness: “Train approaching.”
2008-06

Economic outlook

“The North Carolina automobile-insurance system is — no holds barred — the very worst in the country,” says Eli Lehrer, senior fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit that touts free markets and limited government.
2008-06

Frank Torti

In May, Torti, 60, departed Winston-Salem and his job as director of the Comprehensive Cancer Center at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center for the Washington, D.C., suburbs to take up a new position at the FDA. An experienced clinical researcher specializing in urologic oncology, he will oversee research efforts and launch a fellowship program created, like his job, by the FDA Amendments Act of 2007.
2008-06

Green without envy

I’m not above the occasional indulgence in cheap wordplay, and I’ll prove it with this bit of advice: If you want to make big piles of green money, go brown. “Green,” of course, is shorthand for any activity rooted in environmental improvement. Buildings are green, manufacturing is green and investments are green if the protection and nurturing of the ecology can be demonstrated — or at least claimed with a straight face. Green-ness is a powerful marketing tool these days, on par with (and first cousin to) “organic” in foods and “fair trade” in clothes and jewelry and such.
2008-06

Martin Posey

Martin Posey, chairman of the Department of Biology and Marine Biology at UNC Wilmington, is among a handful of scientists working to restore the Tar Heel oyster population, estimated to be 5% to 10% of what it was in the early 1900s.
2008-06

Oliver Smithies

The call came early in the morning — 4:45, to be exact — but for Oliver Smithies, it wasn’t a minute too soon. For years, colleagues had told the UNC professor he was up for the Nobel Prize in medicine for his ground-breaking research in genetics, but as the years went by with no word from Sweden, he learned to ignore the rumors. When the call finally came last October, it was “a feeling of relief as much as anything else. A feeling of, well, that’s good. That’s finished.”
2008-06

Please write

As publisher, I want to know — and I feel our editors need to know — if all that effort is worth it. There’s a letters section in this issue. We would like to run one every issue. What do you think?
2008-06

Regional Report Charlotte June 2008

It’s not always good to be No. 1. In April, the waterway that courses through the center of the Charlotte region was at the top of America’s Most Endangered Rivers, compiled by American Rivers, a Washington, D.C., advocacy group.
2008-06

Regional Report Eastern June 2008

Imagine a city the population of Greenville — about 75,000 — springing up in Eastern North Carolina in the next three years. That’s what military buildups in the region will amount to, and while one expert calls base expansions “the biggest economic-development announcement in 40 years,” the news has sobering consequences.
2008-06

Regional Report Triad June 2008

Despite his experience with Skybus Airlines, Henry Isaacson is not down on discount carriers. The chairman of Piedmont Triad International Airport says Skybus, which shut down less than three months after opening a hub at the Greensboro airport, showed PTI could thrive with one. “We had more than 81,000 passengers fly on Skybus through March. It was the airport’s No. 1 carrier.”
2008-06

Regional Report Western June 2008

Since 2005, you could have had the Land of the Sky “Any Way You Like It.” Now there’s “Appalachia Comin’ Atcha.” It’s branding season in the Blue Ridge, and the latest slogan-setter is a $20,000 video target- ing visitors with a familial interest in western North Carolina.
2008-06

Stan Eskridge

When Stan Eskridge wanted to help Tom Fischer make an inexpensive bandage that quickly stops bleeding, he turned to his connections. “You can’t be a North Carolina native and not know somebody in the textile industry,” Eskridge, 65, says. His friends helped find the materials to develop Stasilon, a bandage woven from bamboo yarn and glass filament, approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in September.
2008-06

Stoplight up ahead

Each day, tractor-trailers unload goods at warehouses or stores in and around Charlotte. For many, the stop marks a brief foray into North Carolina. They’ve come from Charleston, S.C., or Savannah, Ga., or distributioncenters set up along interstate highways to serve those ports.
2008-06