2009-02

Article Title Issue

Caught in the money pit

As autumn’s chill fell, financial institutions that seemed strong and nimble creaked and buckled.
2009-02

Consider the alternative

Last year, Tar Heel high-tech and life-science workers escaped the worst of the shock waves rippling through the economy.
2009-02

Crop busters

For many in business, agriculture might seem like a quaint abstraction. But state Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler says agriculture and agribusiness, which includes processing, constitute the state’s biggest industry — worth about $70 billion a year.
2009-02

Getting nailed by tight credit

Last year was perhaps the worst in a decade for commercial builders in North Carolina, according to Carolinas AGC Inc., a trade group for general contractors.
2009-02

Hard times

As this is written on deadline, early one morning 13 days before Christmas, the Three Kings from Detroit have been told there is no room for them at the inn.
2009-02

It’s an ill wind that blows

Health-insurance costs for U.S. employers are rising — by about 6% this year, according to one consulting firm — and care is still hard to find in some parts of North Carolina.
2009-02

Shop till you drop

When the going gets tough, Americans tend to go shopping. Consumer spending has pulled the U.S. economy out of many tight spots. But this time, it might take lot more than that.
2009-02

Signing up for unions

It took 16 years, but the Smithfield Packing plant near Tar Heel — where 32,000 hogs a day go in one door and countless pork chops pour out another — is now a union shop.
2009-02

Squeezing out sparks

Three months before panic hit the financial industry, Charlotte-based Duke Energy Corp. started seeing demand for electricity soften.
2009-02

The best-laid plans of governors

In 16 years as governor, Jim Hunt never let anyone doubt what he wanted his legacy to be.
2009-02

The road to recovery

Painfully high gasoline prices in North Carolina crept even higher — averaging more than $4 a gallon — after two hurricanes slammed Gulf Coast refineries in September. Pricey petrol made trains more competitive with trucks and helped bolster rail revenue.
2009-02

Trying to make due

North Carolina has lost more than a third of its manufacturing jobs since the end of 1999, and the exodus accelerated last year when the state shed about 6% of its factory jobs through November.
2009-02

What a piece of work is man

Just one more day to go, and Harry Payne admits he’s a little edgy. Tomorrow he’ll give up his job as chairman of the state Employment Security Commission to Moses Carey, the incoming governor’s appointee. After seven years in office, Payne is looking for work, and the job market hasn’t been this lousy in a long time.
2009-02

Y’all come – and stay awhile

Gasoline prices fell dramatically during the final days of 2008, but it wasn’t enough to help the hospitality industry.
2009-02

‘“ I’ve been very honest with everybody:

On Jan. 10, Beverly Eaves Perdue became the 73rd governor of North Carolina — the first woman to hold the office. The New Bern Democrat spent eight years as lieutenant governor and 14 as a state legislator. Like predecessor Mike Easley in 2001, she took the reins during a recession that threatens state services and programs. She also faces a budget shortfall that her advisers saymight exceed $2 billion — a gap the state constitution charges the governor with closing. Before Christmas, Perdue discussed her plans to do that and for economic development with Contributing Editor Scott Mooneyham. Questions and answers were edited for brevity and clarity.
2009-02