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REGIONALREPORT Eastern

Fowl play in Nash

Laurel, Miss.-based Sanderson Farms Inc., the nation’s fourth-largest chicken processor, announced in August it will open a hatchery in southern Nash County, the first step in a $91.4 million project that is expected to add a processing plant and field to spray poultry waste within five years. The development has drawn fierce opposition from some residents in Nash and Wilson counties who believe the plant will pollute the Tar-Pamlico and Neuse river basins and drain drinking-water supplies. Sanderson promises 1,100 jobs and contracts for more than 100 local farms in a part of the state where the jobless rate is double digits. The county gave it a 146-acre tract valued at $1.2 million for the project.

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Briefs

CASTLE HAYNE — The Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved a license for GE-Hitachi Global Laser Enrichment to build a plant at its 1,600-acre headquarters here that would use laser technology to enrich uranium. The company believes the technology could help power nuclear reactors but has not decided whether to go forward with the project.

JACKSONVILLE — The Federal Aviation Administration awarded Albert J. Ellis Airport a $13.6 million grant that will allow it to replace its terminal. The FAA previously contributed $11 million to the project, which will begin in December and is expected to take 18 months.

REIDSVILLE —  Global Textile Alliance will expand its plant here, investing $7.4 million and adding 55 to its local workforce of 130. The company, based here, makes bedding and upholstery fabrics for U.S. furniture companies.

WILMINGTON — City Council members approved a deal with the Atlanta Braves and Mandalay Baseball to build a $37 million minor-league baseball stadium on the riverfront downtown. Voters will decide in a referendum Nov. 6 if  a 2.5-cent property-tax increase will pay for the 6,200-seat stadium.

SOUTHPORT Dosher Memorial Hospital named Tom Siemers CEO, effective this month. He replaces Edgar Haywood III, who worked at the 25-bed hospital for 20 years.