2005-01

Article Title Issue

Legal Elite - Real Estate

Ask Barry Mann to tell you something about himself, and the first thing he says is that he has great hair. Indeed he does, a fine mane of graying blond locks. But it isn’t his hair so much as his response that helps explain his success as a real-estate lawyer. His joking invites casual conversation. Once all parties are at ease, more serious matters can be discussed.
2005-01

Legal Elite - Tax

Ray Farris sees all types. The greedy children. Drunks, addicts, degenerates. Irresponsible, unreasonable spouses. He’s who many of Charlotte’s well-heeled turn to when they need an iron-clad will, trust or estate plan to protect assets, keep their financial affairs private and prevent nasty family disputes. “It’s the whole panorama of the human experience,” he says. “It is not amusing. But it certainly is a vibrant slice of life.”
2005-01

Legal Elite 2005

Lawyers elected these practitioners as top of their class in a dozen business-related fields.
2005-01

Moonstruck

Few could have foreseen the change that came over the governor as the election approached. Most of his first term, he had seemed uncomfortable in his skin, moping around the mansion, going about his official duties without really relishing them. It was as if running the state wasn’t something he could sink his teeth into. But come the election, Mike Easley was ready to howl.
2005-01

She seeks to slice price hospitals pay

As a student at South Mecklenburg High School in the 1970s, Susan DeVore worked weekends at Mercy Hospital typing its policy-and-procedures manual. It helped her understand how a hospital works, she says.
2005-01

This furniture maker pushes values-added

Taylorsville-based The Mitchell Gold Co. isn’t your ordinary furniture maker. While many companies in the industry have slashed employment, this one added about 100 jobs and increased revenue 15% in 2004 and will wrap up a 240,000-square-foot expansion in early 2005.
2005-01

Up on the law

Who are the best business lawyers in the state? That’s what Business North Carolina sets out to determine each year. And who better to tell us than Tar Heel lawyers themselves?
2005-01