2007-01

Article Title Issue

2007 Legal Elite

These members of the bar are top-shelf: the state's best lawyers, picked by their peers, in 14 categories.

2007-01

Delta says dip causes it to take off from Kinston

In Eastern North Carolina, Delta Air Lines giveth ó sometimes in return for incentives ó and Delta Air Lines taketh away.
2007-01

Designing woman seeks to shape Triad economy

Design may not be among the first things that come to mind when thinking of the Triad. Furniture and cigarettes, yes. Textiles, maybe. But as traditional industries leave, the regionís economic boosters have designs on design. Thatís where Carol Strohecker comes in.
2007-01

Doc knows success comes in small doses

Raleigh-based NeoFax LLC is a product of Tom Youngís frustration. Early in his medical career, he found there were no guides for prescribing medicine to infants.
2007-01

Duke case leaves it out in the coal

Itís not that Duke Energy Corp. would rather fight than switch when it comes to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rules.
2007-01

He credits patrons' consuming ambition

Steve Katsadouros never followed through on a boyhood ambition to be a dentist, but he enjoys watching people sink their teeth into the hot dogs he sells as owner and president of Hot Dog World in Hendersonville.
2007-01

Law firms wrangle over ways to attract and keep talent that's headed to the top of the profession.

Law firms wrangle over ways to attract and keep talent that's headed to the top of the profession.
2007-01

Legal Elite - Antitrust

I started working as a janitor in a nursing home at 14. You name it, I did it, and along the way I cleaned up every body fluid known to man. This is part of what I learned:
2007-01

Legal Elite - Bankruptcy

While in college, I was a lifeguard in my hometown for a few summers. I enjoyed the kids at the pool and being outdoors, but I hated the sunburn and the heat. I was bored and watching the clock all day. It didnít take me long to realize that any future jobs would have to be mentally challenging. I have to be busy and productive, or Iím not happy. Thatís why I love being an attorney.
2007-01

Legal Elite - Business Law

I spent most of a summer in Rockingham reconditioning spinning frames in an unair-conditioned cotton mill. It was terribly hot, and at the end of the day you would be covered with lint and have it in your nose and throat. It taught me to want to earn a living with my mind rather than my hands. Also, it taught me to persevere under unpleasant and adverse conditions.
2007-01

Legal Elite - Construction

First job I can remember was working in the cafeteria at Forest Hills School in Wilmington circa 1944. Pay was free lunch. There were about three or four other children working in the cafeteria. In hindsight, I realize that some of them had to work for lunch, whereas I did not. Years later, I met a Wake Forest professor and former football player a few years older than I am who told me about an incident. Some parents objected to white kids ó schools being all-white or all-black back then ó from Seagate, a poor rural area, being bused to Forest Hills School and were successful in getting attendance districts rearranged to exclude them. I was oblivious to the social tensions. Perhaps my job in the cafeteria kept me closer to the kids that had to work for something to eat and away from some of the kids whose parents were such insufferable snobs. If that is the case, I hope it had a positive influence on my value system and how I interact with people.
2007-01

Legal Elite - Corporate

When I was in high school and college, I was lucky enough to have some fairly varied job experiences, from loading trucks to installing feeding, watering and heating systems in poultry houses. For two summers, I was a short-order cook. The work was fast-paced, and I came to appreciate the interdependence of one personís job with anotherís. I initially assumed the cooks had complete control over the flow of the kitchen, but over time I learned about the control the wait staff has over the pace of orders sent to the kitchen and how quickly completed orders are cleared to make room for new orders. My first assessment, although not completely wrong, was made hastily and was incomplete. As a lawyer, I try to be mindful of the importance of listening, observing and collecting sufficient information before drawing conclusions and offering advice.
2007-01

Legal Elite - Criminal

I worked most of my youth and young adult years as a waiter. I learned how to deal with people, what it took to please them, how to deal with them when they were angry or disappointed. I learned people. I learned what hard work was like, working two shifts a day for 11 hours a day, six days a week, cleaning kitchens and depending on the good graces of strangers for income. I met people who did that all their lives, and I saw the toll it took. It helped motivate me to get my education, and once I got it, it helped me greatly in learning how to be successful and how to relate to and accept people for who and what they were.
2007-01

Legal Elite - Employment

n my early teens, I delivered newspapers seven days a week on a bike to 150 customers along a 10-mile route in a small South Carolina town. I was up every morning at 4:30 to finish delivery by 6:30 a.m. I learned how to work independently and to be responsible for myself. I was my own boss. I couldnít call in sick. If I was going to be unavailable, I had to find and pay a substitute. There was no salary. My income was what remained after I paid for the papers. My customers paid me directly, 45 cents per week. If I didnít collect, I didnít get paid. Running this little one-person operation taught me management skills that served me well in the 25 years or so of managing my own law firm.
2007-01

Legal Elite - Environmental

The only summer job I had was working for my father in high school and college. He owned a small machine shop in Detroit. He didnít work 9 to 5. He would wake me up at 4:30 a.m. so we could hit a greasy spoon for breakfast before getting to the shop to open up a little before 6. The day shift ended at 4. Weíd stay until almost 6, then head home, clean up, eat and fall asleep so we could do it again the next day. No one in the shop, including my father, had a college education.
2007-01

Legal Elite - Family Law

As a delivery boy for the Greensboro Daily News, while in the seventh and eighth grades, I learned self-discipline. I had to get up every morning at 4 a.m. ó rain, snow or sleet, warm or cold ó and ride my bicycle to downtown Lexington to roll up 47 newspapers and carry them to neighborhood porches before dawn. This job also taught me rudimentary business skills, and I gained valuable insight into people. Some paid me on time, some did not. I had friendly, appreciative customers, and I had grumpy, curmudgeonly ones. All this diversity was an early lesson about people that I would encounter and would be dealing with throughout my career.
2007-01

Legal Elite - Litigation

I grew up in Johnston County, and most of my relatives were farmers. Anyone who has crawled down a tobacco row at 6 a.m. with gummy leaves hitting you in the face knows that it provides an enormous incentive to work hard in school in order to have an opportunity to do easier work. I came to appreciate many years later that the keys to successful tobacco farming were not dissimilar to the fundamentals of a successful trial practice. There is no substitute for hard work. Despite the best preparation, unexpected events can and do occur. An ability to adjust the game plan is essential, as is the ability to accept that some events are beyond your control. Finally, success is depending on your loyalty to the team working with you and the teamís loyalty to you.
2007-01

Legal Elite - Patents

Before law school, I was a public-school teacher in Hoke County. I taught chemistry and physics and coached football, wrestling and tennis. Being a schoolteacher was terrific preparation for law practice because it forced me to communicate necessary concepts efficiently.
2007-01

Legal Elite - Real Estate

My first job after college was at Salem Academy in Winston-Salem teaching world cultures, U.S. history and European history. While not a rigorous workload by high-school teachersí standards, preparing for three courses five days a week was good training for dealing with multiple transactions. Listening and responding to student questions in and out of class helped to develop an ability to listen and respond to client concerns. Last but not least, living on a teacherís salary developed a real appreciation for the cost of living for most individuals and that we need to provide services at a cost commensurate to their value to our clients.
2007-01

Legal Elite - Tax

My father was a country lawyer in Smithfield, but we lived about five miles out of town on the farm I still operate. When I was 10, my birthday present from my father was an alarm clock. After that, he always said that he did the lawyering and I did the farming. Until I left for college, that clock was set for 5 a.m., when I would get up, lay a fire in the kitchen, then feed the hogs and cows, all before the school bus arrived. I learned the value of time management and, probably more importantly, the direct relationship between effort and results.
2007-01