Business

Lenovo reports disappointing 2Q revenue as China market cools

November 7, 2014

(The News & Observer, Raleigh)

Net income for China-based Lenovo rose 19% to $262 million in the second quarter, beating analysts' projections, but overall revenue fell short of expectations. Slow sales growth in China led to a 2% decline in that market. The world's No. 1 PC maker, which has its North American headquarters in Morrisville, this week launched a marketing campaign for its Yoga laptop in an effort to increase holiday sales.

Solar projects help make NC No. 5 in clean-energy ranking

November 7, 2014

(Asheville Citizen-Times)

North Carolina ranked fifth –up from the No. 10 spot in 2013 – in the nation in clean-energy job announcements, according to a report from Environmental Entrepreneurs, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit organization. 

New Hanover Regional names new information officer

November 7, 2014

(StarNews, Wilmington)

New Hanover Regional Medical Center named Joe Norris vice president of information services. Norris, who was the Wilmington-based hospital system's chief technology officer for three years, was selected following a national search.

Excitement builds over Reynolds Building makeover

November 7, 2014

(Winston-Salem Journal)

The Downtown Winston-Salem Partnership held its annual meeting at the 22-story former R.J. Reynolds headquarters building, which is being converted to a mixed-use development that will include a boutique hotel, restaurant and apartments ("Tower of Power," August). The project is scheduled for completion in fall 2015.

Duke Energy: Coal-ash cleanup could cost $3.4 billion

November 6, 2014

(News & Record, Greensboro)

Duke Energy says it could cost $3.4 billion to comply with the the state's new coal-ash law, which requires all 32 ash ponds at 14 active and retired power plants be closed by 2029. The Charlotte-based utility had previously said it could cost up to $10 billion to close the ponds.

Mining commission to discuss proposed changes to fracking rules

November 6, 2014

(The News & Observer, Raleigh)

The N.C. Mining and Energy Commission will meet Thursday and Friday to consider revising some of its rules for hydraulic fracturing. After receiving more than 200,000 public comments on safety standards for the practice, the agency will consider some changes, including increasing the minimum distance required between drilling and drinking-water sources.

Food Lion parent selling discount grocery chain

November 6, 2014

(The Charlotte Observer)

Food Lion parent company Delhaize will sell its 66 Bottom Dollar discount food stores to German discount grocer ALDI. Just last week, Bottom Dollar's president Meg Ham was tapped to replace Beth Newlands Campbell as president of Salisbury-based Food Lion. All 66 Bottom Dollar stores are in the Philadelphia and Pittsburgh areas.

New Hanover Regional among hospitals facing Medicare penalties

November 6, 2014

(StarNews, Wilmington)

New Hanover Regional Medical Center will be fined $942,000 in Medicare penalties for not meeting guidelines for patient readmissions. Penalties for fiscal year 2015 are based on readmission rates for heart failure, heart attack, pneumonia, chronic lung problems and elective hip and knee replacements. Only 13 of 87 North Carolina hospitals will avoid fines for 2015, compared with 19 in 2013 and 2014.

Helicopter-engine manufacturer closing Union County plant

November 6, 2014

(The Charlotte Observer)

Turbomeca will close its helicopter-engine manufacturing plant in Monroe, phasing out 112 jobs over the next year. The French company opened the Union County plant in 2008 and was awarded about $2 million in local incentives and $3 million in state grants. The company said the closure is due to dwindling demand for its products.

Quintiles founder, private-equity firms to sell 13.3M shares

November 6, 2014

(The News & Observer, Raleigh)

Quintiles chairman and founder Dennis Gillings, along with three private-equity firms, plan to sell off a combined 13.3 million shares of the Durham-based company, bringing their combined stake to less than 50%. The contract-research organization will no longer be considered a controlled company, and it will no longer be exempt from certain New York Stock Exchange requirements that exist to protect shareholders.