Government

Film-industry workers look toward other states as tax credits expire

August 11, 2014

(The Charlotte Observer)

N.C. workers in the film-production industry are considering relocating to Georgia or other states with attractive industry incentive programs. The budget approved by the state General Assembly will replace the state's 25% tax credit with a grant program that will be capped at $10 million.

Rural hospitals hit hardest by Medicaid reform

August 8, 2014

(The News & Observer, Raleigh)

Rural hospitals such as Southeastern Regional Medical Center in Lumberton will suffer the most from Medicaid cuts. More than 10% of patients are uninsured and more than 23% are on Medicaid at the hospital, which lies in a region with some of the highest rates of obesity, heart disease and substance abuse in the state.

 

McCrory signs $21.1 billion budget bill

August 8, 2014

(The News & Observer, Raleigh)

Gov. Pat McCrory signed a $21.1 billion state budget bill that gives public school teachers a pay raise for the first time since 2011. The bill, approved by legislators last week, gives most state employees $1,000 raises.  

Art Pope resigns as state budget director

August 7, 2014

(The News & Observer, Raleigh)

Art Pope will step down as the state's budget director effective September 5. Pope will focus on his role as chief executive of Henderson-based Variety Wholesalers. Gov. Pat McCrory named Raleigh bank executive Lee Roberts as his successor.

Loss of film tax credit worries Wilmington businesses

August 6, 2014

(WRAL.com)

The state budget approved by the House and Senate includes $10 million in grant money for the film industry, about 16% of what the state awarded in tax credits in 2013 and less than half the incentives awarded to "Iron Man 3." Wilmington business owners say the state can't afford to lose the film industry.

 

State closes ball field at Brunswick middle school after coal ash found

August 6, 2014

(StarNews, Wilmington)

The state Department of Environment and Natural Resources has closed the baseball field at a Brunswick County middle school after it was discovered that the land was used for coal-ash disposal. Southport's Cogentrix coal-fired power plant disposed of the ash in the early 1990s, before its hazards were known.

Goolsby resigns from NC Senate

August 5, 2014

(StarNews, Wilmington)

Thom Goolsby resigned from the North Carolina Senate on Monday. The Wilmington Republican, a lawyer, also ran an investment-advisory business until the state Dept. of Commerce revoked his license in May after investors sued his company over losses (Regional Report, July). He was not running for re-election. 

State legislators can't agree on how to adjourn

August 5, 2014

(The Charlotte Observer)

Unable to agree on an adjournment plan, members of the North Carolina House and Senate must hold skeleton meetings every fourth day in order to comply with the state constitution. Legislators running for re-election in November are not allowed to receive campaign donations from certain political action committees while the legislature is in session.

Winners and losers from the NC legislative session

August 4, 2014

(The News & Observer, Raleigh)

Lawmakers approved legislation to allow fracking and voted to replace Common Core standards in public schools, but couldn't agree on a plan for coal-ash cleanup. 

McCrory addresses coal-ash cleanup without legislation

August 4, 2014

(WRAL.com)

After state legislators delayed a coal-ash cleanup bill until November, Gov. Pat McCrory issued an executive order instructing the Department of Environment and Natural Resources to monitor groundwater at 33 coal ash ponds throughout the state. Environmentalists say the action doesn't do enough to protect North Carolina's waterways.